Sunday, November 13, 2011

Our Ancestors The Book: Volume I: The Murosky and Bukowski Family History

The first book in the Our Ancestors series is a written history that incorporates family photographs and historical documents into a 12x12 hardcover book with Dust Jacket printed on high quality paper. The finished product will be between 241 and 280 pages.

The book spans three generations for the Murosky and Bukowski families.

Chapter I is a brief introduction into the family research and the organization of the book.

Chapter II, at approximately 50 pages,  tells the story of the Murosky family history, starting with my great-great grandparents Anthony Murosky and Eva Zielinski . Detailed accounts for each of their children are also featured including photographs and historical documents.

Chapter III, at approximately 87 pages, tells the story of the Bukowski family history, starting with my great-great grandparents Vincinety Frank Bukowski and Franciska Kwiatkowski. Detailed accounts for each of their children are also featured including photographs and historical documents.

Chapter IV, at approximately  63 pages, tells the story of my great grandparents, Anthony Harry Murosky, Jr. and his wife, Helen Tillie Bukowski. This chapter features the largest collection of family photos, starting with Anthony and Helen's wedding photos and photos of their children. This chapter also includes historical documents.

Chapter V, at approximately 13, includes a brief history of my grandparents, Arthur Murosky and Mary Eugenia McDonald. This chapter features a collection of photos from the couple's engagement, wedding and early years together.

Chapter VI will feature some of the well known family recipes.

The book will also include a reference list and an index.

Blurb will be used tor provide high quality printing. The book will remain available online with Blurb to purchase copies at any time. The current pricing is estimated to be about $210.00 if copies are ordered individually.

Cost savings are available if ordered in Volume:
  • 7 to 9 books will be bring the cost down to $199.50
  • 10 to 49 books will bring the cost down to $189.00
  • 50 or more books will bring the cost down to $178.50
If you are interested in purchasing a copy, please contact me as cost savings can be achieved by ordering in volume. The book will be completed for this holiday season if you would prefer to view a copy before placing an order.  

Monday, August 22, 2011

Our Lithuanian Heritage

As discussed in previous posts, it was commonly thought by oral tradition that the Murosky name was Lithuanian in origin.

New research of the family living in Forest City, Pennsylvania has proven the Lithuanian origin to be fact. My 2nd great grandparents, Anthony and Eva Murosky, were recently located in both the 1920 and the 1930 United States Federal Census. In both cases the family was still residing in Forest City, Pennsylvania.

In both the 1920 and 1930 census Anthony and Eva indicate that they were born in Lithuania. This coincides with restoration of Lithuania to an independent state on February 16, 1918.  When the 1920 and the 1930 census were recorded those who were both in Lithuania were able to acknowledge the true country of their birth. Anthony and Eva also list that the native language they spoke in their country of birth, known as the mother tongue in the census, was Lithuanian.  The couple may have spoken multiple languages as they are also listed as speaking Polish. Both Anthony and Eva indicate that their mother and father were born in Lithuania.  The census is based on first hand information obtained from the individuals and can be taken as fact.

As I had previously suspected, Anthony and Eva settled within the Lithuanian community that was growing in Forest City, Pennsylvania. It was common for immigrants of one nationality to settle together after arriving in America. In the United States, the Lithuanian community would have had the freedom to practice their own cultural traditions. Anthony and Eva’s oldest daughter Margret married John Chanis who was also an immigrant from Lithuania. John’s parents were also Lithuanian. John made the trip from Europe in 1910 when he was 14 years old.

Daughter Margaret is recorded as living with her husband John Chanis in Forest City, Pennsylvania in 1920 with their oldest child, John Jr.. Margret and John were neighbors to her parents renting neighboring homes on Main Street.

Interestingly enough, around the time I made discovery of Lithuanian origin in the census I crossed paths with an airline employee who resides in Chicago but also commutes to New York for work. On a flight to New York, I overheard him discussing Lithuanian Folk Dancing which caught my attention.


After getting to know him, I learned that he is also of Lithuanian descent. His Father-In-Law is the editor of Lithuanian Heritage Magazine, a bimonthly publication that that plays tribute to Lithuanian culture old and new. I truly think fate was at work as I now have connections to learning more about our culture and heritage.

My new colleague was kind enough to bring me a copy of the magazine. If you are interested in learning more about Lithuanian Heritage and Culture I highly recommend you register for a subscription. The issue of the magazine I have is fantastic.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

The First Father - Anthony Murosky, Sr.

The Murosky line begins with Anthony Murosky, Sr, my 2nd great grandfather. The first known references to Anthony are records from the 1910 United States Federal Census listing Anthony and his family living in Forest City, Pennsylvania.

Verbal history indicates that Anthony was an immigrant from Lithuanian-Baltic region. The 1910 Census indicates that Anthony arrived in the United States in 1892. During the late 1800's almost 20% of the population of Lithuania left the country. Many relocated to the United States. During this period, the country was in a difficult position lying between the growing empires of Russia and Germany.

Anthony married Eva Zielinski, my 2nd great grand mother, around 1894. Eva was also an immigrant who arrived in 1894.


Anthony worked as a miner in the coal mines of Forest City, Pennsylvania. At the time of the census, Anthony and Eva lived at 128 Delaware Street, Forest City.


 


































The living children of Anthony and Eva include:

  •  Anthony Harry Murosky, Jr.
  • Margaret Murosky
  • Joseph Muroski Sr.
  • William Murosky
  • Constance "Esther" Murosky
  • Charles Muroski

The spelling of Murosky varied with the children, some adopted Murosky and others adopted Muroski

Anthony Harry Murosky, Jr., my great grand father,  the oldest son moved to Erie, Pennsylvania in search of work where he settled, married and raised his children. In time, some of the other siblings would also relocate to Erie, Pennsylvania.

After the death of Eva around 1930 in Forest City, Pennsylvania, Anthony Murosky, Sr. moved to Erie to live with his children.  Anthony was a heavy drinker and it ultimately lead to he accident which causes his death. News articles and reports from his grandchildren indicate that on 17 Dec 1939 he had been out drinking. On his way home he was hit by car 26th and Wallace. He was taken to St. Vincent's hospital where he later died.

Anthony was buried 22 Dec 1939, Calvary Cemetery, Section 18. Grave 1. After some recent searching, using www.findagrave.com, I was able to confirm that Anthony was buried in Calvary Cemetery.

You can visit his grave today, by going in main entrance and staying  on main road. Go to the intersection between Section 15 and 18. Take a left and go to fence. Anthony's grave is on the northeast corner of 181.

References:
  1. 1910 U. S. census, 1910 United States Federal Census schedule, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, Family of Anthony Meroski. Supervisor's District 10, Enumeration District 64, Enumeration Date April 28, 1910, Lines 31-37.; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com).
  2. Murosky, Anthony, Sr. (1939, December 20).  Erie Daily Times News, Erie, Pennsylvania.
  3. Find A Grave Memorial# 9271239 www.findagreave.com


Saturday, June 11, 2011

A Letter from Tarawa

To make sure we never forget the sacrifice of those who came before us read the letter written from Capt. Martin F. Barrett, U.S.M.C. of F. Company, 2nd Battalion 8th Marine Regiment to Caroline Loretta O'Neill the Aunt of Ambrose Aloysius McDonald, Jr. describing the death of Ambrose on November 20, 1943 on the first day of the Battle of Tarawa.  It is unknown how the letter made it to Caroline, the letter ended up with Ambrose's sister Virginia McDonald Geary. Throughout her life Virginia made certain that Ambrose was never forgotten and that her children, with exception to her oldest, knew about the Uncle they never had the opportunity to meet.

Tuesday, February 1st, 1944

Dear Miss. O’Neill:
Although I have already written to Ambrose’s mother concerning his death, I feel I should write again and give you further information about him. It is hard for me to write about such things, because he was such a fine boy, and so much liked by everyone. I do, however, want to tell you how he died, because you should know that.

As you know, we landed on Tarawa on Nov. 20th, and we were in the assault, that is, we were the first to hit the beach. Ambrose got in alright and did excellent work. I saw him about ten o’clock in the morning and he was fine, getting along swell. In the afternoon, I learned he has been hit and died instantly. It was just around noon when he was hit by a Jap bullet and died instantly, no suffering, no pain, he really didn’t know what hit him. He was buried on Tarawa, and Father Laughlin, our chaplain, said the prayers for the dead.

About a week before we landed, a priest came aboard and we all went to confession, mass and communion.  Ambrose was there too, and he received with the rest of us. Just before we landed, general absolution was given, so rest assured that Ambrose is now happy in heaven. That is one consolation that you all have, I’m positive he died in the state of grace.

You know how sorry I am for you and nothing I can say will lessen your grief. His death is a great loss. And may his soul rest in peace.

Sincerely,

Capt. Martin F. Barrett, U.S.M.C.
F. Company, 2nd Batn. 8th Marines
F. P.O. San Francisco, Cal.

Note - While this letter is for Caroline Loretta O'Neill, one of Virginia's Aunt's whom she lived with before getting married on 15 Jul 1938. She also lived with Eleanor Monica O'Neill , both are my 2nd great grand aunts, also known affectionately as "Aunt Nora" and  "Aunt Carrie". It is uncertain how the mixup of the name happened.

Michelle M. Murosky: The McDonald Collection &emdash; Ambrose Aloysius McDonald Jr.
Ambrose Aloysius McDonald, Jr. 
Ambrose volunteered for military service and joined the Marine Corps. He earned a Purple Heart for his service. In addition to being remembered at the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial in Honolulu, Hawaii he now has a memorial in Arlington National Cemetery,  thanks to his sister Virginia McDonald Geary

From the Virginia McDonald Geary Collection. Photographer Unknown. Editing and digital restoration by Michelle M. Murosky.

Ambrose Aloysius McDonald, Jr. and Virginia McDonald Geary are my 1st cousins 3x removed. They are the children of Ambrose Aloysius McDonald, my 2nd great grand uncle and Gertrude Anna O'Neill, my 2nd great grand aunt. My relationship with Ambrose Aloysius McDonald, Jr. and Virginia McDonald Geary  is unique in that we are double 1st cousins 3x removed. We share two sets of common ancestors. Our common McDonald grandparents are Michael McDonald and Anna Haggerty. Our common O'Neill grandparents are Michael O'Neill and Ellen Cunningham. Caroline Loretta O'Neill and Eleanor Monica O'Neill are my 2nd great aunts.

References:

  1. http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/battle-of-tarawa

Sunday, June 5, 2011

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Civil War Veterans

In honor of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, I wanted to honor the veterans in our family. In all of the cases listed below, the men who fought were all born on foreign soil. Each was born in a different country. All were immigrants to the United States with their families. These men must have felt compelled to fight for new life that they and their family had established.

John Loll, my 3rd great granduncle, was born in Marcholsheim, Alsace, France on 08 Oct 1843. He is the son of Antoine Loll and Mary Ann Jehl, my 4th great grandparents. He arrived in the United States on 07 Oct 1852 at the Port of New York when he was 9 years old with his family. At the age of 18 he would serve in the Union Army. In February of 1862 he would be wounded in battle and would die as a casualty of war on June 10, 1862 in a hospital in Washington, D.C.

John Lauer, was the husband of my 3rd great grandaunt Francisca Loll. Francisca was the sister of John Loll above and the daughter of Antoine Loll and Mary Ann Jehl, my 4th great grandparents. John was born 15 May 1841 in Baveria, Germany the son of George Lauer and Ursula Bendorfer. John is said to arrived with his parents to the United States in 1846. John would have been around 20 at the start of the war. A Proud People A Proud Heritage, compiled by the compiled by the History Committee of St. Joseph Parish, Lucinda, Pa. indicates that John was taken as a prisoner of war on April 25, 1864. He later re-joined his regiment on December 16, 1864.

James McDonald, my 3rd great granduncle, as told in family stories handed down over the years is believed to have fought in the Civil war. I have personally not verified this information but a grave marker recorded at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Crown, Clarion County, Pennsylvania found in Virginia McDonald, my 1st cousin 3x removed, genealogy records indicated that James McDonald was corporal in the 63rd regiment of the war. James would have been about 32 at the time of the civil war. James is estimated to be born around 1829 in Ireland, the son of David McDonald and Bridget, my 4th great grandparents. As told by Virginia McDonald,

"Michael McDonald's brothers were scrappers and some of them fought in the Civil War." - Virginia McDonald

The Michael McDonald she references was her grandfather and my 3rd great grandfather. I am hopeful that future research will indicate other Civil War veterans in the McDonald branch of the family based on Virginia's first hand accounts of visiting the Michael McDonald family as a child.

References:
  1. The Lolls, Book I. The Antonine Loll Family Tree, Page 5
  2. The Lolls, Book I. Summary Data on Anthony and Mary Ann Keal Loll Family, Page 10
  3. A Proud People A Proud Heritage, compiled by the compiled by the History Committee of St. Joseph Parish, Lucinda, Pa.
  4. Find A Grave Memorial# 114581616 www.findagrave.com
  5. National Park Service. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
  6. U.S.,1890 Veterans Schedules (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com, 2005), McDonald, James. James started his military service as a private in the 63rd Regiment Volunteers of F company.  His service was  August 1861 through October 1863. (2 years and 2 months)  He was shot in the right arm.
  7. A. J. Davis, History of Clarion County Pennsylvania: with Illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers (Syrcuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., 1887), Brief Personals. Loll, Joseph. Page xxxiii.
  8. A. J. Davis, History of Clarion County Pennsylvania: with Illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers (Syrcuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., 1887), Chapter XIX Company F, 63rd Regiment. Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines. Page 194-195.
  9. A. J. Davis, History of Clarion County Pennsylvania: with Illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers (Syrcuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., 1887), Chapter XIX Company F, 63rd Regiment. Battle of Chancellorsville. Page 199-200.
  10. A. J. Davis, History of Clarion County Pennsylvania: with Illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers (Syrcuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., 1887), Chapter XIX Company F, 63rd Regiment. Page 201
  11. A. J. Davis, History of Clarion County Pennsylvania: with Illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers (Syrcuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., 1887), Chapter XIX Company F, 63rd Regiment. Page 202.
  12. A. J. Davis, History of Clarion County Pennsylvania: with Illustrations and biographical sketches of some of its prominent men and pioneers (Syrcuse, N. Y.: D. Mason & Co., 1887), Chapter XIX Company F, 63rd Regiment. Page 207.
  13. John Woolf Jordan, LL.D., Genealogical and personal history of the Allegheny Valley Pennsylvania, III vols. (New York:  Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1913), Page 839. View the book here: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/John_Woolf_Jordan_Genealogical_and_Personal_Histor?id=VNQqAAAAYAAJ

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

The O'Neill Connection To St. Patrick

In honor of St. Patrick's day, I wanted to highlight the O'Neill family connection to St. Patrick.

All information on the older O'Neill ancestors, my 3rd great grand-parents and beyond, is from Patrick G. O’Neill, my 1st cousin 3x removed, who wrote the O'Neill Descendants of Con & Katherine 1700-2000 with George K. O'Neill, another distant O'Neill cousin, I was able to purchase the book he wrote and learn more about the O'Neill family.

The O'Neill line begins with my 2nd, great grand-mother, Winifred Agnes O'Neill. Winifred was born 03 Sep 1874 in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Michael O'Neill and Ellen Cunningham, my 3rd great grand-parents.

Winifred Agnes O'Neill and Robert Alphonsus McDonald by michelle.murosky

Winifred Agnes O'Neill and her husband Robert Alphonsus McDonald


Michael O'Neill was born 19 Sep 1827 in County Leitrim, Ireland. Michael was the son of Thomas O'Neill Jr. and Bridget Conboy, my 4th great-grandparents. Thomas O'Neill Jr. and Bridget Conboy had nine children, all were born in County Leitrim, Ireland. Birth records for some of the later children indicate the birth location was Sruhan, Fenagh Parish, County Leitrim, Ireland.


Michael O'Neill


Michael sailed from Liverpool on May 12, 1851 on the ship "Roscius". He would have departed Ireland during the "Great Famine" which struck the country between 1845 and 1852. This would have been a period of incredible hardship for the Irish people and we should be thankful our ancestors lived through this period considering the large amount of death that resulted.

He settled in Clarion County Pennsylvania. He married  Lucinda Jane Aaron on 13 Feb 1855 in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. They had six children together before Lucinda died on 20 Apr 1870. Michael married Ellen Cunningham on 20 Apr 1871 in Clarion County, Pennsylvania. They had ten children together.  Michael died on 08 Feb 1892 in Limestone Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania at the age of 64.

Michael's father Thomas O'Neill Jr. was born about 1799 in Ireland the son of Thomas O'Neill Sr. and Leticia York, my 5th great grand-parents. Thomas O'Neill Jr. died on 19 Jul 1873 in County Leitrim, Union of Mohill, District of Rowan, Ireland at the age of 74.  Thomas was buried at the Fenagh Abbey Cemetery, Fenagh Parish, County Leitrim, Ireland.

Fenagh Abbey is one of the most ancient monastic sites in Ireland. (Additional images Fenagh Abbey) It is said that nineteen Gaelic Kings are buried in the graveyard. History has it that St. Patrick's early work preaching was at a site several miles north of the present day abbey ruins which date from the fifteenth century.

At least two generations of our direct O'Neill line lived in this general area before departing Ireland for the United States. Only two of Thomas O'Neill Jr. and Bridget Conboy's nine children remained in Ireland.
 
References:
  1. O'Neill Descendants of Con & Katherine 1700-2000

Sunday, March 6, 2011

In Memory of WWI Veterans

March 25, 2016 This post was updated to correct the label on the photograph.

In honor of the death of the last WWI veteran, Frank Woodruff Buckles on February 27, 2011, I found it fitting to honor the military service of family members who were also veterans of WWI.

Currently, the only known veteran of WWI is Robert Edwin McDonald, my great grand uncle. Robert was born in Clarion, Clarion County, Pennsylvania on Feb 1, 1899 the third child born to Robert Alphonsus McDonald and Winifred Agnes O'Neill. Additional work in the research process should reveal more specific details about Robert's military service.

Virginia Dorothy McDonald Geary, my first cousin 3x removed, recalls her Robert Edwin McDonald, her first cousin, coming to visit her parents, Ambrose Aloysius McDonald and Gertrude Anna O'Neill, in his military uniform after returning from the war when she was five years old at their home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It should be noted here that Virginia's father Ambrose Aloysius McDonald was the younger brother of Robert's father Robert Alphonsus McDonald and Virgina's mother Gertrude Anna O'Neill was the younger sister of Robert's mother Winifred Agnes O'Neill. This made Robert Edwin McDonald and Virginia Dorothy McDonald Geary double paternal first cousins.

With the known dates of Virginia's birth and Robert's birth, Robert would have returned home from military service sometime in 1919 when he was about 20 years old. Virginia also indicates that he was one of the soldiers who suffered from the effects of poison gas during the war. 

After returning home from his military service Robert visited with other family members who were living on the North Side of Pittsburgh at that time. Robert relocated to California shortly after arriving back in the Unites States and never returned to Pennsylvania after moving. It is unknown if Robert moved due to continuing military service or personal preference. His younger sister, Madeline Gertrude McDonald, traveled to California to visit him during her lifetime.

The details of Robert's life in California are unknown at this time.
Michelle M. Murosky: The McDonald Collection &emdash; The McDonald Family
Three Generations of the McDonald Family
Three Generations of McDonald family members photographed:
Back: Loraine Anthony McDonald, [my great grandfather], Frances Philomena Selker [my great grandmother], Winifred Agnes O'Neill [my 2nd great grandmother],  Robert Edwin McDonald [my great grand uncle].
Front: Robert Alphonsus McDonald [my 2nd great grandfather] most likely holding Francis Winifred McDonald [my great aunt].


The location of the photograph is not known. Loraine Anthony McDonald and Frances Philomena Selker were living in Clarion County, Pennsylvania in the early 1920's. This photo could have been taken in Clarion at the home of Robert's parents or the home of his older brother Loraine Anthony McDonald.

This photograph would have been taken after March 18, 1920 for Francis Winifred McDonald to be included in the picture. 

This photograph was included in the Frances Philomena Selker Collection. Frances Philomena Guth appears to have passed the photographs down to her daughter Frances Philomena Selker. Frances' daughter Mary Eugina McDonald ended up with her mother's photo collections which is time were handed down to me. Photographer Unknown. Editing and digital restoration by Michelle M. Murosky.

Sunday, February 27, 2011

The French Connection

I am currently in the process of incorporating the research on the French side of the family tree that was done by William E. Loll, my 3rd cousin 2x removed, who wrote 4 volumes of Family History on the Loll Family and traveled to France to do research.

The French Connection begins with Theresa Loll, my 3rd great grandmother. Theresa was born May 12, 1835 in Marcholsheim, Alsace, France. Theresa was born during the last monarchy in France, Louis Philippe I was King of France.

Theresa was the fourth of eight known children born to Antoine Loll and Mary Ann Jehl. During Theresa's childhood there was protest and revolt around France. Strikes and worker demonstrations were becoming more common among the laboring classes. February 24, 1848 brought the end of the monarchy in France when Louis Napoleon Bonaparte was elected President of France by popular vote.  

When Theresa was 17, she moved with her family from Marcholsheim, Alsace, France to the United States. The family ranging from her mother to her four year old sister departed from the Port of Le Harve, France on the "Brig Olivia" or "Bark Olivia". Specific details on the vessel are unknown. From other recorded manifests, the ship was able to provide passage for approximately 159 passengers.  

 
The family arrived at the Port of New York October 7,1852. Interestingly enough, the ship's manifest only includes nine Loll family members, listed as French farmers. Theresa's Father, Antoine Loll is not listed. It is plausible that he traveled to the United States ahead of his family and re-connected with them in the United States. It is unknown if the family moved to the United States to avoid the civil unrest in France or if they interested in the propects of a new life.  

The family then traveled from New York and settled in Knox Township, Clarion County, Pennsylvania.

Theresa was married within a year of arriving to the United States. On January 20, 1853, at age 18, she married Leopold Guth, 23, at the Immaculate Conception Church in Clarion, Clarion County, Pennsylvania. Leopold Guth, born November 14, 1830 in Untersimmonswald, Province of Baden, Germany the son of Anton Guth and Theresia Rösch . Leopold's estimated arrival was in 1850.  Leopold Guth was a jeweler and watchmaker, a skill he leaned from his father.

Nine years after Theresa arrived to the United States, she and her family would live through the Civil War. Her brother John Loll would serve in the Union Army at age 18. In Feburary of 1862 he would be wounded in battle and would die as a casualty of war on June 10, 1862 in a hospital in Washington, D.C.

Leopold and Theresa are documented as living in the Clarion Borough, Clarion County, Pennsylvania on June 1, 1880 according to the 1880 United States Federal Census. On June 7, 1900 Leopold and Theresa are documented as living on Main Street, Clarion, Clarion County, Pennsylvania according to the 1900 United States Federal Census.

Leopold and Theresa had 12 children, 11 of which the names are know. I am a descendant of their daughter, Frances Philomena Guth, my 2nd great-grandmother.

Notable historical events in Theresa's life included the assassination of two Unites States Presidents, President Lincoln on April 14, 1865 and President McKinley on September 6, 1901, the US Purchase of Alaska on March 30, 1867 and the Great Chicago Fire on October 8, 1871.

Theresa lived to be 69 and died on September 12, 1904. She is buried at the Immaculate Conception Church Cemetery in Clarion, Clarion County, Pennsylvania.
References:
  1. 1880 U. S. census, 1880 United States Federal Census schedule, Clarion, Pennsylvania, Family of Leopold Guth. Supervisor's District10, Enumeration District 66, Enumeration Date June 1, 1880, Lines 35-42.; digital image, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com).
  2. 1900 U. S. census, 1900 United States Federal Census schedule, Clarion , Pennsylvania, Family of Leopold Guth. Supervisor's District 14, Enumeration District 6, Enumeration Date June 7, 1900, Lines 19-21.; digital image, (www.ancestry.com).
  3. Find A Grave Memorial# 84821479. www.findagrave.com
  4. Find A Grave Memorial# 84821414. www.findagrave.com

Monday, February 14, 2011

Valentine Loll ~ 1718 - ????

In honor of St. Valentine's Day, I wanted to highlight Valentine Loll, my 6th great-grand uncle who was likely named after St. Valentine.

Valentine Loll was baptized on 06 Apr 1718 in Muntzenheim, Alsace, France according to the Muntzenheim Catholic Church archives. In this era, baptism typically occurred very close to birth. Valentine was the son of Joanne Loll and Catherine Unternaire, my 7th great grand parents.

Valentine married Ursula Holinger on 04 Oct 1740 in Muntzenheim, Alsace, France according to the Muntzenheim Catholic Church archives. He would have been around 22 at the time of his marriage. He and Ursula had two sons.

Valentine was born at a time of war in France and lived through war in Europe so it is not surprising his occupation was listed as a mercenary. Louis XIV had died three years before Valentine was born, Louis XV had just started his reign. By 1718 when Valentine was born France was joined the War of the Quadruple Alliance against Spain. In 1733 there was again war in Europe, The War of the Polish Succession, followed by an additional conflict in 1740, War of the Austrian Succession.

If Valentine was still living, he would have been around 57 when Louis XVI of France and Marie Antoinette were crowned King and Queen of France on 11 June 1775.

Joanne Loll and Catherine Unternaire are my 7th great grandparents. Valentine Loll is my 6th great uncle. 

References:
  1. The Lolls, Book I. The French Loll Family Tree, Page 34
  2. France, Muntzenheim Catholic Church (Muntzenheim, Alsace, France), "Church Logbooks"Copies of the Muntzenheim Catholic Church Records translated from Latin by William E. Loll
    Written in 1990 by William E. Loll, Page 18 of the The Loll's Book II.

First Cousin 2x Removed, Second Cousin - What does it mean?

One item that can be tricky in family tree research is understanding relationships between individuals. Understanding parents, grandparents and children is relatively straight forward. Understanding the relationships between cousins is what tends to be the most confusing. The term second cousin is often used incorrectly.

Some basic information on understanding the relationships between cousins, that I am using from Wikipedia and Genealogy.com:

The degree (first, second, third cousin, etc.) indicates one less than the minimum number of generations between both cousins and the nearest common ancestor.
  • First Cousin: a person with whom one shares a grandparent (but not a parent). These individuals are typically the children of your aunts and uncles.
  • Second Cousin: someone with whom one shares a great-grandparent (but not a grandparent or a parent)
  • Third Cousin: someone with whom one shares a great-great-grandparent (but not a great-grandparent or grandparent or parent)
  • Fourth Cousin: someone with whom one shares a great-great-great-grandparent (but not a great-great-grandparent, great-grandparent or grandparent or parent)

The removal (once removed, twice removed, etc.) indicates the number of generations, if any, separating the two cousins from each other.
  •  The child of one's first cousin is one's first cousin once removed because the one generation separation represents one removal.
  • Oneself and the child are still considered first cousins, as one's grandparent (this child's great-grandparent), as the most recent common ancestor, represents one degree.
  • Removal can also be listed with an x. Example 2x indicates two times removed.
A cousin chart is also a great visual to understand the degree and removal relationships between individuals.

A double cousin is when two siblings of one family reproduce with two siblings of another family. Double cousins share both sets of grandparents in common. Genetically, they can be as closely related as half-siblings.

Information Obtained From:
  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cousin_Removal, February 14, 2011
  2. http://www.genealogy.com/16_cousn.html, February 14, 2011

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Thank You

Before I go into more specific details of my research, there are numerous individuals I have to thank for helping me on this research journey. Without their valuable contributions, I would not be in the place I currently am with my research. Family Tree research also allows generations to bridge gaps, I consider it a true honor to have met so many wonderful people on my journey, to learn about their stories and experience their lives. Names below are in no particular order.

  • My Grandfather Arthur who has patiently answered numerous questions, provided stories and helped me outline the Murosky and Bukowski family trees to the best of his knowledge.
  • My Father who has taken several road trips with me to Clarion and Vowinckel, Pennsylvania. We visited several sites and cemeteries together on these trips.
  • Edward Zelazny, my first cousin 2x removed, who provided information on the Bukowski family and allowed me to copy his family records and photos.
  • Rita Ann Murosky Niemi, my Great Aunt, who provided additional information on the Bukowski and Murosky Families. She also took me to see the graves of my 2nd Great Grandparents, Vincinety Frank Bukowski and Franciska Kwiatkowski.
  • Tom Murosky, my 3rd cousin, who has provided information on his ancestors.
  • William E. Loll, my 3rd cousin 2x removed, who wrote 4 volumes of Family History on the Loll Family and traveled to France to do research. I was able to purchase all 4 of his volumes and learn more about the Loll Family.
  • Patrick G. O’Neill, my 1st cousin 3x removed, who wrote the O'Neill Descendants of Con & Katherine 1700-2000 with George K. O'Neill, another distant O'Neill cousin, I was able to purchase the book he wrote and learn more about the O'Neill family.
  • Virginia Dorothy McDonald Geary, my 1st cousin 3x removed and also a double cousin, was the oldest living McDonald when I met her last September 2010. She was able to provide first hand accounts of McDonald and O'Neill family members and of visiting Vowinckel, Pennsylvania. She allowed me to copy her family records and photos. I had a lovely visit with Virginia when I flew to Pittsburgh.
  • My McDonald Great Aunts and Great Uncle have been a great source of information about the McDonald family and also about how they grew up.
  • Mary Lynn McDonald Walters, my 1st cousin 2x removed, who was able to provide me with information on the descendants of Cyril Clair McDonald, my Great Grand Uncle.
  • Sr. Janet Staab, my 1st cousin 2x removed, was able to provide me with information on our collective Selker and Guth ancestors. She also allowed me to copy her records and photos.
  • Philip Franz Selker, my 1st cousin 3x removed, was a wonderful treat to meet. I met Philip in college when I was visiting my husband (who I was not yet married to, in Illinois). My husband and I took the train to Chicago to meet Philip, his wife and his daughter. When we got off the train, Philip knew who we were, he said by my "German features". We had a lovely visit, learned about Philip, his WWII military service and about his family.
  • Bernice Clotilda Huefner Wolbert, although not a direct family relation, was able to provide me with information about other family members I was related to. Bernice also provided me the connection for being able to purchase a copy of A Proud People A Proud Heritage, Compiled by the History Committee of St. Joseph Parish, Lucinda, Pa.
  • My Aunts who have provided additional information along the way.
  • Benjamin Patrick Norris, my 3rd cousin 2x removed, has provided a wealth of knowledge on the McDonald, Haggerty and Lynam families.  Benjamin also had extensive knowledge of Vowinckel, Clarion County, Pennsylvania which has been very helpful.
  • Bernard A. Clark, my 7th cousin 2x removed, has done some really fantastic research. Bernard was able to provide details and point me to several helpful references on the Kuhn side of the family which was living in the Pennsylvania before the American Revolution.
  • Cary Christopher, a very experienced genealogist who I connected with in spring of 2014. He researched the McDonald family for a descendant. Cary very kindly shared his very complete and detailed research with me. He also shared family photos and other details he received from other McDonald descendants. 
  • Leo Selker, my 2nd cousin 1x removed, has provided many details on my 2nd great-grandfather Joseph William Selker (our shared grand parent), stories about the family who lived in Clarion. He has also been very kind to share copies of family photos and other family mementos.
  • J. F. Easly, a distant cousin, who wrote a very detailed history on the Easly family. His very detailed and well sourced work includes very specific details and references to many court records. The records document both land, wills and other proceedings. The original author did future generations an amazing service as this research was done before the internet and the search engines that are available today. If you are interested in research - it is highly recommended to read this work.
  • There are other individuals who I have made contact with during my journey who have provided insite, links to sources and suggestions on contacts.



Virginia Dorothy McDonald Geary, my 1st cousin 3x removed and I during my visit to Pittsburgh September 2010

Saturday, February 5, 2011

World Connect - View the Family Tree

The world connect project is hosted by Rootsweb. World Connect allows researchers to upload their family tree for other researchers to view and search. Doing this often allows new connections to be made when multiple individuals are searching the same person.

My research is posted to World Connect. The research is current as of today. Informaiton about living individuals is not posted. The link below will take you to my pedigree displayed in a visual format. Viewing the pedigree in this fashion the major and minor ancestral lines will be visible.

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=mmurosky&id=I1&style=TEXT

The Minor Lines

There are a number of minor family names that occur on both the Paternal and Maternal Sides of the family. The minor lines typically contain two surnames in succession. It is plausible with more research more will be discovered about the minor lines.

Paternal Minor Lines

The Paternal minor lines are an exception to what is noted above. In this case, these two lines are listed as there are only four known names currently known in the Paternal lines Bukowski and Murosky as discussed in separate posts and the two surnames listed below.

Kwiatkowski
Nationality - Polish
Arrival to the Unites States -May 1, 1895

The Kwiatkowski line begins with my 2nd great grandmother Franciska Kwiatkowski. She is the oldest currently known individual in the Kwiatkowski  line. She was born in Poland  around May of 1864.

Zielinski
Nationality - Russian/Polish
Arrival to the Unites States -May 1, 1895

The Zielinski line begins with my 2nd great grandmother Eva Zielinski. She is the oldest currently known individual in the Kwiatkowski  line. She was born around 1870 possibly in Poland.

The Maternal Minor Lines
The minor material lines contain more names in succession.

Allonas
Nationality - French (although it should be noted this portion of France changed borders with Germany often over the course of history)

The Allonas line begins with my 5th great grandmother Madeleine Allonas. The records from Marcholsheim Church in Marcholsheim, Alsace, France document the marriage of Madeleine Allonas to Franciscus Antonine Loll, my 5th great grandfather, on  16 Jun 1786.

The oldest currently known individual in the Allonas Line is Madeleine's father Anthony Allonas, my 6th great grandfather.

Cunningham
Nationality - Irish
Arrival to the Unites States - June 1869

The Cunningham line begins with my 3rd great grandmother Ellen Cunningham born 24 Aug 1847 in County Waterford, Ireland. The oldest currently known individual in the Cunningham Line is Ellen's father Mathias Cunningham, my 4th great grandfather.

Haggerty
Nationality - Irish
Arrival to the Unites States -Date is currently unknown, however the family was in the United States by the 1840's  

The Haggerty line begins with my 3rd great grandmother Anna Haggerty born around 1845 in Farmington, Clarion County, Pennsylvania. The oldest currently known individual in the Haggerty Line is Anna's father Robert Haggerty, my 4th great grandfather.

Hofhaus
Nationality - Fuerstenau, Germany

The Hofhaus line begins with my 3rd great grandmother Katherine Elizabeth Hofhaus born 20 Oct 1829 in Fuerstenau, Province of Hanover, Germany. The oldest currently known individual in the Hofhaus Line is Katherine Elizabeth Hofhaus's father Wilhelm Hofhaus, my 4th great grandfather born in Fürstenau, Germany.

Rösch 

Nationality - German

The Rösch line begins with my 4th great grandmother Theresia Rösch born 1801 in Untersimonwald, Margraviate of Baden, Holy Roman Empire. The oldest currently known individual in the Rösch Line is Theresia's father Johann Rösch , my 5th great grandfather.


Friday, February 4, 2011

The Maternal Lines - Loll

Loll
Nationality - French
Arrival to the Unites States - October 2, 1852

The Loll line begins with my 3rd great-grandmother Theresa Loll. The oldest currently known individual in the Loll Line is Joanne Loll, my 7th great grandfather, born around in the late 1600's in Muntzenheim, Alsace, France.


There are currently 11 generations of ancestors that descend from Joanne Loll.

The Maternal Lines - Guth

Guth
Nationality - German
Arrival to the Unites States - 1850

The Selker line begins with my 2nd great grandmother Frances Philomena Guth. The oldest currently known individual in the Guth Line is Anton Guth, my 5th great grandfather, born around in the 1700's in Germany.


There are currently 9 generations of ancestors that descend from Anton Guth.




Frances Philomena Guth, my 2nd great grandmother.

The Maternal Lines - Selker

Selker
Nationality - German
Arrival to the Unites States - 1885

The Selker line begins with my great-grandmother Frances Philomena Selker. The oldest currently known individual in the Selker Line is Hermann Selker, my 4th Great Grandfather, born around in the 1700's in Germany.


There are currently 8 generations of ancestors that descend from Hermann Selker.











Joseph William Selker, my 2nd great grandfater.

The Maternal Lines - O'Neill

O'Neill
Nationality - Irish
Arrival to the Unites States - May 1851

The O'Neill line begins with my 2nd great-grandmother Winifred Agnes O'Neill. The oldest currently known individual in the O'Neill Line is Con O'Neill, my 8th great grandfather, born around 1650 in Ireland.
There are currently 12 generations of ancestors that descend from Con O'Neill.



Michael O'Neill, my 3rd great hrandfather.

The Maternal Lines - McDonald

The Maternal line begins with my grandmother Mary Eugenia McDonald

McDonald
Nationality - Irish
Arrival to the Unites States - unknown, but there are references to the family in United States in the 1830's

The McDonald line begins with my grandmother Mary Eugenia McDonald. The oldest currently known individual in the McDonald Line is David McDonald, my 4th great grandfather, born around 1803 in Dublin, Ireland.

There are currently 8 generations of ancestors that descend from David McDonald.

Michael McDonald, my 3rd great-grandfather with his wife Anna Haggery and his adult children in front of the family home in Vowinckel, Clarion County, Pennsylvania.

The Paternal Lines - Murosky

Murosky
Nationality - Russian/Lithuanian
Arrival to the Unites States -1892

The Murosky line begins with me. The oldest currently known individual in the Murosky Line is Anthony Murosky Sr., my 2nd great grandfather, born in November of 1863. It is believed the Murosky family is from Lithuania however there are no written sources to verify this claim.

There are currently 6 generations of descendants from Anthony Murosky Sr.

Anthony Murosky Sr., my 2nd great grandfather











The Paternal Lines - Bukowski

To get started, the Ancestral Families of the Murosky Family will be introduced. More details will be provided in later posts. The Paternal line begins with my grandfather Murosky's parents.

Bukowski 
Nationality - Polish
Arrival to the Unites States -May 1, 1895

The Bukowski line begins with my great-grandmother Helen Tillie Bukowski. The oldest currently known individual in the Bukowski Line is Vincinety Frank Bukowski, my 2nd great grandfather, born in November of 1861 in Poland.
There are currently 6 generations of descendants from Vincinety Frank Bukowski.






Vincinety Frank Bukowski, my 2nd great grandfather




Welcome

Our Ancestors – The Murosky & McDonald Ancestral Lines was launched February 4, 2011. The site is maintained by Michelle M. Murosky is a family historian and genealogist. She has been researching her ancestors for over 15 years. The site is used to share research updates and old photographs with family.

In addition to maintaining the research site she is currently working on the “Portraits of a Life” project. The goal of this project is to digitize, archive, restore and share her family’s old photographs. She has the photo collections of her great-grandmothers in her care.



Her great grandmother Helen Tillie Bukowski, her paternal grandfather’s mother, was the original family historian. She took many photos of her children, her parents, her husband’s parents, her siblings, her husbands, her nieces and her nephews. There are hundreds of photos ranging from the early 1900’s through the 1950’s. She also recorded the names and dates on many of the images. Her record keeping was impeccable and has assisted with identifying individuals in the unlabeled photos. In addition to several large albums there were also many loose photos, newspaper clippings and post cards.

Spring of 2014 she acquired the photo collection of Frances Philomena Selker – her paternal grandmother’s mother. This collection of photographs includes many old photographs of members of the family from Clarion, Pennsylvania. This collection includes a grouping of tin-type photographs which are over one hundred years old.

When she isn't working on family history or restoring old family photographs she enjoys photographing nature. Check out her photography portfolio or follow her on Instagram.